TRX’ercise Training is here!

Finally, after lots of planning and finding the right venue, ‘TRX’ercise Training’ is finally here and I have now started two TRX Suspension Trainer classes each week.

I am very excited about these classes as I never recommend a product or service that doesn’t work. I’ve been using the TRX for years both with clients and more importantly my own training, so I know first hand the benefits of it. It really works and my training hasn’t just improved, it’s become more fun and functional with the TRX. There are also a number of sports clubs and football clubs using the TRX at present as part of their training, such as Liverpool F.C and Manchester City F.C. If professionals at that level use it, it can’t be that bad, can it? Personally I think it is one of the best fitness tools anyone can have and I’m sure my classes will be very popular when others experience the TRX and see or feel the benefits for themselves.

So what does the TRX give that other workouts can’t?……

The TRX doesn’t restrict movements at all, so the workout can be functional creating exercises from everyday movements. It also helps control exercises that people might struggle with normally because of bad posture or technique. It adds a balance factor which helps hit deeper stabilising muscles(especially the core and the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulders) and adds more difficulty to an exercise. The most important feature is that there are no heavy weights or no need to change weights between exercises. The simplicity of its design means that all exercises are with your own body weight and can be changed easily with a simple shuffle of the feet or hands, to increase or decrease the amount of bodyweight you are performing the exercise with! For example, many women struggle with press ups because generally they aren’t physically as strong as men, in fact a lot of men struggle with press ups too! But with the TRX the resistance can be decreased by raising the angle of the body to perform a press up at more of an incline. This makes exercises like press ups more manageable and appealing to a lot of people. One main benefit is that impact exercises can be controlled a lot more, so a great cardio workout can be achieved as well as a strength session. My favourite benefit is that the core of the body stabilises every movement we make but with the TRX it enhances the work through the core giving a fantastic session with each and every workout. With all these benfits, how can you not give it a try?

Now you’ve heard about what the TRX can offer you, why not come along to one of my classes and try it for yourself. Here are the details of classes…..

If you would like more information about the classes, please feel free to contact me on 07949 235586 or via my contact form to ask any questions you might have.

If you want to experience the TRX before committing to a weekly class, I am currently offering the first outdoor class at Bankside Park for FREE, so you can try it first. Remember to book in if you want to take advantage of this free class.

Come along and see what all the fuss is about. I hope to see you at a class in the near future.

Latest ‘Exercise of the Month’ – October 2012

I have just released my latest ‘Exercise of the Month’. This month we look at the muscles of the stomach and upper leg. This lower abdominal and hip flexor exercise is a great exercise for gaining a flat stomach and a strong core.

In this video I show a progression from a beginner to a more advanced exercise. The most important point to make about this video is about the posture through the spine. Whilst lowering the legs, the stomach must remain tight holding the back on the floor. Only do these exercise if you can keep your back on the floor and not arching the spine. When the exercise becomes too easy, progress to the next but only if you can maintain the same posture through the spine when progressing.

So here is the video for this months lower abdominal & hip flexor progression…..

I hope you enjoyed this months exercise and don’t forget to leave your feedback on my contact form.

COMING SOON!

Recently I’ve been looking for a few courses for CPD(Continuing Professional Development) and also some qualification that will enable me to put on an extra class or two.

I’ve been using the TRX Suspension Trainer for a long time so it seemed the perfect place to start. TRX stands for Total Body Resistance Exercise. It’s such a fantastic piece of equipment that I recommend highly and take with me whenever I’m away from my studio and want a workout. It’s portable, light, versatile and creates an amazing full body workout. So, last week I took it one step further and gained my Level 2 Certificate in Suspension Training. This enables me to put on a class and show everyone else just how good a workout that can be achieved with the TRX.

So I’m thrilled to say that I will be starting a TRX class in the very near future. The wheels are now set in motion and the equipment has been ordered, so keep your eyes peeled for class dates really soon! If you are interested in a TRX class, please feel free to get in contact and ask any questions or ask for your name to be added to my mailing list, that way you will get up to date information on classes, offers and much more. If you’ve not heard of the TRX or you don’t know much about it, don’t worry, I’ve made the video below especially for you. This will give you an introduction into the TRX, how to use it and some of the many exercises that will be covered during a class with me. Enjoy the video…..

Now you’ve seen a taster of the TRX, if you are interested in attending a class as part of your training, contact me by filling in the form on my contact page or call me on 07949 235586.

It’s time to take your fitness to the next level.

Latest ‘Exercise of the Month’ – July

It’s that time again where I give you a short video clip of my favourite exercise for the month that you can do at home by following my pointers. This month requires a little imagination and although I use equipment, there are plenty of railings or climbing frames at local parks that will be sufficient to carry out this exercise, so here it is…..

Exercise of the Month – Body Row Progression – July

This months ‘Exercise of the Month’ is an upper back exercise. It’s the perfect exercise for completely changing a kyphotic posture typical of your average office worker that is hunched over a desk all day long. By strengthening and tightening the upper back muscles(Rhomboids and Trapezius), it pulls the shoulder blades together stopping the rounded posture of the shoulders and the hunched back. Here I show a progression from a basic body row to a more advanced body row by using a stability ball for added balance and to engage the core muscles. If this exercise is too difficult, you can always walk your feet closer to the body and stand more upright if there is a bar high enough to do so. This will decrease the weight you will lift during the exercise and as you progress in strength, you can always walk your feet further away again. Follow the quick tips and give it a go.

You don’t necessarily need a squat rack like I use in this video, I have also performed the same exercise at a local park using a dip station, a waist height  horizontal pole round the edge of a car park and even a climbing net in a children’s play area. If you use your imagination, the great outdoors can be your equipment!

Don’t forget to let me know how you get on!

So, you now have another month before the next video is published, which should be plenty of time to practice and progress through the three stages of this exercise, that’s if you have some extra equipment of course! Remember, I like to hear your stories and how you find the exercise when you try it out, so please feel free to comment and leave your feedback.

Thanks for viewing my video and I’ll see you again next month.

Exercising with Cancer – Exercise Provides a Greater Quality of Life

I’ve not ever published a guest blog but I’ve been contacted recently by David Haas of Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance who was keen to write an article about how exercise can help cancer patients. With the Virgin London marathon just around the corner and me running it for Macmillan Cancer Support  after fundraising for the last six months, it seemed a very fitting subject, so I agreed to let David write a guest post for my blog. Here’s what David has to say….

Exercise Provides a Greater Quality of Life

Exercise is important for individuals who are experiencing cancer at any stage: diagnosis, treatment or recovery. The type of exercise recommended may vary but overall exercise can help individuals with cancer have more energy, be physically healthier and feel better than those who do not partake. An exercise plan should be developed with the help of a physician so that it is deemed safe, but it is important for individuals going through cancer to try their hardest to stay physically active.

There are many types of exercise that can be helpful during cancer. If an individual is feeling tired and lousy because of treatments or medications it is recommended that light exercise be performed regularly. This can include taking a short walk around the neighborhood or hospital, or doing light stretching or yoga. These activities will help invigorate a tired patient but will not make them feel exhausted or increase their feelings of sickness.

Individuals who are experiencing troubles with their lymph nodes during a cancer prognosis are prompted to exercise to help reduce swelling. Light weight lifting, mild aerobic exercise or yoga are all helpful during this time. This should be performed under the recommendation of a physician to ensure that it is safe for the patient. People with cancer, such as mesothelioma, can feel better after doing some health-promoting exercises.

Yoga is an exercise that is good for people in all stages of cancer because it is a mind and body exercise. This means that it helps the body to grow stronger and fitter but it also helps relax the mind. Yoga has been known to bring spiritual awareness to people and help them gain a more positive attitude on life. If this is performed during cancer treatment or recovery there is a better chance that the patient will feel better and fight harder to cure themselves of the disease.

Having cancer can cause depression in many people. Exercise helps to elevate the feel-good chemicals in the body that naturally help diminish depression. Patients who exercise regularly do not report having as many problems with depression as others do who do not exercise. This is one more reason why adding a few minutes of exercise to a person’s daily routine can help them to recover from cancer more quickly.

Life after cancer requires that individuals exercise to help prevent future cancer from occurring. Exercise can help prevent the occurrence of many types of cancer including breast, colon, endometrial and many others. It is recommended that adults recovering from cancer exercise three to five days per week for at least one hour at a time. A healthy lifestyle that includes eating a diet rich in nutrients can also help the individual’s quality of life. Fighting cancer is a difficult battle and exercise can help people get a little closer to winning. There are no guarantees when it comes to cancer but individuals who exercise generally feel better than those who do not.

If you, a friend or a family member are going through cancer, why not speak to someone like David and have a chat about how exercise can help you and what you should be doing. You can contact David through his blog at The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance Blog.

If you would like to find out why David’s blog is so fitting, please feel free to read my story and why I’m running the London marathon for a cancer related charity at my just giving page.

Remember, exercise can help in all areas of life, whether you have an illness or you don’t. You are not alone; there are plenty of people across the world that you can talk too that will help you and support you along the way.

Thanks for reading David’s post.

Starting at the beginning

Recently I’ve found myself thinking a lot about people starting exercise for the very first time and trying to remember how I first started exercising. During my long training runs in preparation for the London marathon, I have had a lot of time to reflect on my life, my training, what drives me and the goals I’ve set and achieved over the years, and it has got me thinking about what it would be like for someone who isn’t naturally into keeping fit, or those where exercise isn’t second nature to them. For someone like me it’s very hard to imagine not having regular exercise in my life, so from time to time it’s good to take a step back and think about it from a beginners point of view to appreciate the difficulties they have to overcome. To do this I started by asking myself a few questions…….

 Q1. How would I feel about going to the gym for the first time if I didn’t know where to start?

 Q2. What would my fears be about exercising if I was overweight/out of shape?

 Q3. What advice would I like to be given if I was starting to exercise for the first time?

Answering these questions as if I was a beginner gave me a good idea about how a beginner might feel and it gave me an idea about how I can help others that don’t know where to start or what to do.

Here’s my conclusions: With anything in life, the unknown can be daunting and exercising for the first time is no different. We all get paranoid that people will watch and stare if we don’t know what we’re doing and they might make comments. The truth is, everyone has to start somewhere and making the first step is the hardest. Once that’s done, it gets easier each time you are willing to put the effort in. People don’t like to fail so if we look at something in a negative way and believe we can’t do it, many people won’t attempt it and therefore they can’t fail.

I think Michael Jordan’s quote sums this up quite well…..

“I can accept failure, everyone fails at something. But I can’t accept not trying.”

– Michael Jordan

“There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.”

– Colin Powell

In life, the best athletes don’t become the best because they never fail, they become the best because they have failed at times, they learnt from their mistakes and improved on them until they became the best. Failure isn’t losing; failure is not trying in the first place!

So I believe a beginner would like a few tips that could help with the basics and give them a base level or something to build on. With that in mind I’ve come up with a few ‘do’s and don’ts’  that could help someone take the first step to a healthier life.


Do……commit to a schedule whole heartedly as results don’t happen over night. It takes time to get in shape so stick with a routine and let your body respond to it. Nothing in life is free we have to work hard for it, so don’t expect it to come to you, work hard to go and grab it.

Don’t…..make excuses and miss workouts unless it really can’t be helped. Missing workouts lead to a slippery slope of not doing them at all and lets face it, what is more important than your health? NOTHING!

Do…..take things slow. The Sistine Chapel wasn’t built in a day and neither is your fitness levels. If you’re starting from the beginning, you have to WORK your way to the end before you reach your goal. See it as the rungs of a ladder, take one step at a time! This leads us nicely into the next don’t…..

Don’t…..push it too hard too soon. Imagine your muscles as elastic bands; if an elastic band sits in a cupboard for too long without being stretched it loses its flexibility and strength, and if stretched too much straight away, it will snap. Your muscles and body are the same. They need time to adjust and get the flexibility and strength to progress step by step and pushing it too hard too soon will only lead to injuries.

Do…..set yourself goals but make them realistic. Giving yourself something to aim for is great for motivation but if it’s well out of reach and unrealistic, it can also become demoralising if you don’ t reach it. SMART(Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic, Time) goals are always a good start.

Don’t……set yourself one big goal. It’s always good to set short term and long term goals so that there is always something to aim for that isn’t in the distant future. Never reaching a goal can again be demoralising so small goals will keep you heading in the right direction(going back to the rungs of the ladder again!).

Do……ask for help or advice if you don’t know what you’re doing. There is no harm in asking someone who knows what they’re doing for some advice. There are a lot of people out there that are willing to help, so don’t think you are on your own.

Finally…..

Don’t…..give up! We all have good and bad days but we need to experience the bad to really enjoy the good. Exercise is a learning curve and over time it can really improve your health and life as a whole. There are many benefits to keeping fit and healthy, so remember next time you feel like giving up just how much good you are doing for your body. The fact that regular exercise can help you live a longer, healthier life should be enough to keep you wanting to make a habit of it.

So there are my tips for any beginner that is thinking about exercising for the first time. I hope they help you reach your goals and inspire you to start making your body healthier sooner rather than later.

Good luck!

Have you quit yet?

The last month has been a crazy period since my last post. This time of year can be the busiest period for a personal trainer with all the health and fitness new year’s resolutions that people make. As it’s such a big thing for a lot of people to set goals/targets at the beginning of the year, I thought it would be the perfect subject for a blog. So, my question to you(if you’ve made a new year’s resolution!) is, ‘have you quit yet?’

Many people use a new year as a fresh start and the chance to start again and make things happen. A lot of new year’s resolutions I hear about are about lose weight, eating healthier, stop smoking, training and competing in an event(triathlon, marathon etc) and to generally be more healthy. The problem is, as humans we aim high and sometimes too high! Some of us set a target which is just unrealistic in the short term and it can be demoralising if we don’t reach our goals in the time we want to. That’s not to say we won’t get there in the future if we continue to work hard towards our goals, but many people just fall at the first hurdle and quit as their original goal just looks impossible to reach. I believe there are ways in which we can help ourselves reach those goals without quitting and I’ve come up with a few tips that I think might be helpful to prevent you from quitting before the end of January!

Here are my tips to help you stick to your new year’s resolutions and have a fitter, healthier and happier year:

  1. Mini targets: You may have a goal in mind and like I said it is reachable if you work hard towards it, but it may be something you will achieve in the long term. Try breaking it down in to smaller targets so that you have something more reachable in the short term. By working hard towards a goal but not reaching it for a long time, it can get mentally tough and easy to give up! None of us want to give up so make it more achievable. For example, you might want to lose three stone in weight. Three stone is a lot to lose if you do it the correct way(2 lb’s a week!) and could take six months or more if you work towards it religiously and get the 2 lb loss each week. Only seeing the odd ‘lb’ or so loss each week makes three stone seem so far away, so why not aim towards half a stone within a month which is much more realistic and gives you a short term goal. 
  2. Rewards:  Taking on board the tip above, once you’ve set your small targets, try treating yourself every time you reach a ‘mini target’. Being successful without rewards can also seem pointless until you reach your main goal and see the overall reward. So, treating yourself at each small target you achieve, makes it a little more fun and gives you an incentive/something to aim for. For example(using the same example as above), every time you lose half a stone, buy yourself something you wouldn’t normally buy, like a new item of clothing for your new body shape! 
  3. Moderation:  Cutting out the bad is always the right way to go but if you are used to something, cutting it out straight away can end up leaving you with cravings, for example, cutting out cigarettes or a certain food to lose weight. Why not try to cut down a little at a time or if you do choose to cut it out of your daily routine, there is no harm in having it once every so often(in moderation) and do it less and less until you are completely sure you are ready to stop all together. Cutting something out of your diet or nicotine out of your life all together straight away can lead to a relapse as the craving is too much to handle. Wait until you are mentally strong enough to completely stop before you force yourself to stop. 
  4. Facts:  This won’t work with all new year’s resolutions or with all people for that matter, but it’s human nature to enjoy seeing black and white facts on how well we’re doing and the successes we’ve had or having, and generally simple facts are enough to spur us on. Writing a diary or logging data is a great way to look back at past success and give us belief again when things aren’t going quite as well as they did at the start. Sometimes progress slows down and is less noticeable so graphs and figures are great for showing you may still be heading in the right direction and if you’re not, they might just give you the kick up the backside that you need to get on the path for success again! For example, you might have only lost half a ‘lb’ this week and you think you’re getting no where fast, but if you look back, you may well have lost a stone in total and it can be a positive action to keep you smiling and not quitting!

So there are my tips to help you reach your new year’s resolutions. Some might not work for you or they all might work as everyone is different and our minds work in different ways, but hopefully from the four tips above you might have got something to keep you heading in the right direction. Remember….nothing worth having in life comes without hard work!

If you’ve read this blog, I’d love to know your new year’s resolutions, how you’re getting on with them and what you are doing to reach them? Please feel free to share your comments, you never know….your success stories or advice may well help someone else in the same situation.

Thanks for reading my blog and good luck in 2012 in reaching your goals, whatever they may be.

Adding ‘lb’s’ Over Christmas!

Coming up to the festive season, many of us start thinking about how much we eat and some of the junk we end up putting into our body. With this comes the problem of standing on the scales and taking a gasp as we see our weight much higher than before the Christmas break. Sometimes it’s not just a couple of added ‘lb’s’ that we end up having to shift with our New Year’s resolutions, it can be much more and not the greatest way to see in the New Year. So what can we do to prevent this from happening and still enjoy the treats of Christmas?

Image

Unfortunately, there is no magic wand that can help us with the problem of gaining weight after eating badly. Fortunately, there is something far better……EXERCISE! In the ideal world we would all eat healthily and enjoy some regular exercise which would go hand in hand to keeping us all fit and healthy inside and out, but we all know this isn’t going to happen! Obviously I would always advise everyone to eat the right foods, drink the right fluids and exercise regularly but there are times during the year when we all want to let our hair down and enjoy ourselves. With that comes junk food, alcohol and lack of sleep. Stress can also be a major problem for the body which is why having time to relax and have some fun is important too. So it’s all about finding a balance!

I personally don’t agree with counting calories as that feels very restrictive and no way to live, but it’s common sense that if you burn off the added calories you put into the body with some of the junk food, it helps to keep the weight off. So the solution to the problem is obvious; if you eat fattening foods you have to work harder to burn them off! There is no easy route in life to be successful, it requires hard work and dedication. Fitness is no different and Vince Lombardi has made some fantastic quotes explaining just that, here are a couple of my favourites….

“Dictionary is the only place that success comes before work. Hard work is the price we must pay for success. I think you can accomplish anything if you’re willing to pay the price”

“A man can be as great as he wants to be. If you believe in yourself and have the courage, the determination, the dedication, the competitive drive and if you are willing to sacrifice the little things in life and pay the price for the things that are worthwhile, it can be done”

I think these quotes typify my views to exercise and keeping fit. If we put the work in, we get rewarded for our efforts! You have two choices……

  • Make sacrifices and restrain yourself around the junk food and alcohol that helps us pile on the ‘lb’s’ over Christmas. Eat healthily and maintain how you would normally live throughout the year.
  • Exercise regularly throughout the Christmas break and be able to eat some treats and enjoy yourself, knowing you are limiting the damage by burning more calories through exercise.

It is harder to lose weight after the damage is done than to maintain it through regular exercise at the time! To give you an indication of how much effort it takes to burn off the wrong foods, here is an example…

Image

A Mars bar contains roughly 280 calories. For a 150 lb person to burn off the calories in a Mars bar they would need to run for about 25 minutes if they were running at a pace of 6mph.

Obviously these figures would change with the weight of the person and speed they run at. This is just an approximate guide but it shows how much effort needs to be put in to burn off one minute of enjoyment from eating that Mars bar, so is it worth it and are you willing to work hard to burn it off?. Now ask yourself this question and the answer will tell you if you should take choice number one or number two above….

Are you dedicated and hard working enough to exercise regularly to burn off the amount of calories you will consume over Christmas?

If your answer is no then stick to choice number one and make some sacrifices, if it’s yes then enjoy exercising over the Christmas period and you’ll have the opportunity to treat yourself too! 

I’ll leave you with a tip to a question that so many people have asked during my time as a personal trainer and one that so many people have problems with already and others will have over Christmas…. “What is the best abdominal exercise to get a flat/toned stomach?”

If you do plan on working hard and being able to have the Christmas treats,  just remember one thing…..you can do as many abdominal exercises as you want but your abdominals will not show if there is body fat over the top! Sit ups, abdominal crunches and any other core exercise will not be enough to burn the fat needed to see visible abdominal muscles, that comes from cardiovascular exercise for about 30 minutes at a time at a steady pace. There is no harm in building your core strength and when the body fat percentage decreases, the abdominals will be more visible.

Time to start planning your Christmas exercise schedule! Have a great festive period.

Fail to Prepare; Prepare to Fail!

After using the phrase ‘Fail to prepare; prepare to fail!’ this week, I thought it would be a great place to start when writing my blog. As I’m in the process of training for the London Marathon in 2012 I find myself back in the same mindset as I was as a footballer, not leaving anything to chance and making sure every training run is prepared for properly. It made me think about how others prepare themselves for their sports or just for training in general. I’ve come up with a few questions and tips that might help you train and perform to your best…..

  • Are you eating the right foods before training or the main performance? 

TIP – What you put into your body prior to training/performing will provide you with the energy you need to perform at your best. If you don’t eat right, don’t expect to perform to your best! High carbohydrate foods before hand should leave you with the energy to perform at a good level without feeling tired/drained. I tend to eat foods like, chicken, pasta, rice, bananas, toast and cereal. The size and type of food depends on the time of day I eat it and how long I have before the performance. Ideally, a big meal should be eaten 3 hours prior to the performance or smaller, lighter foods such as toast for anything closer to the performance. Remember to leave enough time for your food to go down and start the digestion process or it will sit on your stomach and make it uncomfortable to run or move when performing.

  • Are you drinking enough of the right fluids before and during training or the main performance?

TIP – Very similar to the tip above, the fluids that you put into your body prior to and during training/performing, will prevent you from becoming dehyrated and will replace lost salts from sweating. Drinking plenty of water before training/performing will help the body be at its best. If you feel dehydrated the damage is already done! It only takes 2-3% of water loss in the body before endurance starts to suffer and your performance also suffers. A little bit more(5%) and it effects the mind making it hard to concentrate and the body continues to suffer with pace slowing down. Keeping hydrated is vital! Isotonic drinks are a good tool during training/performing as they replace lost salts and also have a high concentration of carbs to keep the energy levels up. If possible, try to take plenty of fluids with you during your training/performance and keep drinking small amounts at regular intervals. It’s easier for sports like cycling for obvious reasons that you can connect a drink to your bike, but I’ve been known to hide drink bottles in a quiet place on a route I plan on taking a long distance run, so that I have a drink at certain stages of that run. Don’t neglect drinking fluids and make sure they are the right fluids, not fizzy drinks, tea, coffee etc as they are diuretics and will only dehydrate you more!

  • Do you have the right equipment and clothing?

TIP – This is a very important tip! Having the wrong equipment or clothing could be costly, not just because of comfort but because you can risk injury. Until you know a sport, it’s very difficult to know what you might need, so make sure you speak to the right people and get advice on the essentials from people who perform in that sport or know their stuff. An example: Until running long distances, you might not have ever thought about blisters, chafing, correct trainers for your gait etc, but all of them can make the difference between performing at your best and a very uncomfortable event. Clothing such as 1000 mile blister free socks, lined shorts, vaseline or other lubricants to prevent chafing and correct trainers(sometimes fitted with orthotics if necessary!) are a must. Sometimes it’s trial and error but there are specific sports shops that can advise you if you need help. How about riding up a steep hill on your bike and the gears keep slipping? Again something that can cause an injury if you’re on a road amongst traffic and can really make your ride much more difficult. Maybe it’s about the right foot wear in a football match. Do you have moulded boots for hard grounds and studded boots for soft weather grounds? It’s not just the equipment/clothing it’s also the colour! I have recently been on a training run in the clothing you can see in the picture to the right which looks fine until you know I went out later in the day and misjudged the time. I ended up running in the dark in black clothing without any reflectors on. I rarely make mistakes like this and there were no problems on the run, BUT there could have been and next time I might not be so fortunate. I have learnt from my mistake and it’s a good mistake to highlight as an example of the title of this blog.

So in conclusion, don’t leave things to chance! There are many more tips I could give you about performing to your best but the blog would go on all day, so I’ll save it for another day. The higher the level you perform at, the smaller the margins are. Not drinking enough, eating the wrong foods at the wrong time, wearing the wrong clothing and using the wrong equipment and generally not preparing for your performance could be the difference between being a winner or a loser! What would you rather be?

Exercise: Back to Basics!

Recently I have heard a few people say “Don’t you have to be quite fit to have a personal trainer?” or “I need to get a little fitter before I have some personal training.” and my answer has been…..”NO, not at all! Every single one of us is an individual and our bodies work in very different ways. We all have to start somewhere and what better way to start than have professional advice from the beginning, rather than try when you don’t really know what you are doing!”

A friend of mine sent me some fitness blogs a few days ago and although most of them were a good read, there were points I disagreed with, one point in particular stood out in my mind and I would like to give my opinion to it. Here is the quote……

“Never do cardio right before weight training, doing cardio uses up your stored glycogen which will greatly compromise your energy level during weight training. On the other hand, doing weight training first will use up the stored glycogen then the body will look for fat to burn as energy.”

As I said above, every individual is different and has different goals. It is true that if you do cardio before weights, you will generally feel more tired during the weights but there is no reason why you can’t burn fat during a weights session too! Also, it completely depends on what is more important to you as an individual to what you do first. For instance, if you want to burn fat and gain general fitness, I would suggest the cardio comes first as it is more important for your overall goal, whereas if you wanted to concentrate more on building muscle or toning up, then the weights section would be more important and should come first, whilst you are fresh and can perform to your best. The other reason why I disagree with this statement is that when doing cardio, if you keep your heart rate to the correct zone, burning fat as an energy source rather than glycogen is easily done. So, like I said, we are all different and it’s about finding out what works for you.

Exercise is like trial and error, as long as the basic guidelines are followed and you are exercising in the correct manner and performing exercises safely(with the correct posture), the rest is about what works for you. You might find that a friend tells you to try something that has got them great results and when you do, you achieve nothing. This is because your body is not the same and will respond differently to some exercise than others.

What is important is consistency, will power, a positive mental attitude(PMA) and belief that with hard work you CAN……be what you want to be, work towards the shape you want to be and become a fitter healthier person. So, with this in mind, I’ve come up with a few pointers that might work for you and help you in the right direction to living a healthier lifestyle:

  • When starting to exercise for the first time or starting up again after a long break, don’t be stubborn and push it too hard too soon. Listen to your body and what it is telling you. If it has a few aches and pains, acknowledge them but don’t ignore them. If you try to push through them you are likely to injure your body by putting it under too much stress before it is ready.
  • Don’t neglect the boring bits! What I mean by this is the warm up and cool down before and after each session. These are not there just to make you look like you know what you are doing, they are there because you DO know what you’re doing! A warm up and cool down will get the body ready to exercise and also bring the body back to a resting state afterwards. Imagine your muscles like an elastic band; if an elastic band is left for too long in a draw and then taken out and stretched immediately, it is likely to snap. The idea of a warm up is to get the muscles warm and more flexible so they aren’t overstretched straight away and tear like the elastic band! Dynamic stretches(stretches on the move) are a big part of a warm up. It is also there to increase the body’s circulation and dilate the blood vessels ready to deal with the body’s need for oxygenated blood when exercising more vigorously. A cool down is just as important to flush away the lactic acid build up in the muscles to reduce stiffness/soreness in the body over the following few days. Static stretching is a big part of a cool down so that the muscles don’t tighten up and shorten after exercise. Keeping the muscles supple is a major part of any exercise programme.
  • Rest is just as important as exercising itself! If you continuously put the body under stress you are actually making micro tears in the muscles of the body. Without sufficient rest to recover, these tears will not repair right and an injury is on the cards. Scar tissue build up is very common from overworking without enough recovery and this can lead to a bigger muscle injury preventing you from exercising all together for weeks on end. Again, listen to your body and it’s aches and pains and if you feel like you need a day of rest and recovery, you probably do BUT this shouldn’t be used as an excuse to get out of exercising. Be honest with yourself because consistency is key.
  • Keeping your body hydrated is a must! Many people neglect the correct fluid intake which can be a bad mistake. The fluids lost from sweating whilst exercising means they are in constant need to be replaced. A dehydrated body will lead to fatigue and the muscles don’t perform as they should causing muscle pulls. It is important to prevent dehydration by continuously topping up your fluid intake before, during and after exercise to replace the lost fluids and body salts. A hydrated body will perform better and is less likely to have muscle injuries, which means regular exercise can continue consistently.
  • Lastly, many people struggle with knowing how many times a week and for how long they should exercise. There is no right or wrong(within reason!) but there are some good guidelines to follow. When starting up, try building up the time of the session gradually starting at 15-20 minutes and over time increasing it to roughly an hour maximum. Also, start with one or two sessions a week and add more as and when the body starts to recover quicker and you feel ready to exercise again. Three sessions a week is more than adequate to maintain a good fitness base but if you want to exercise more, there is no reason why you shouldn’t as long as you give yourself a day or two to rest every so often. Exercising five to six times a week is the maximum I would advise purely so there is a day or two to break the week up for a recovery period.

I hope this blog has given you an insight into a few basic pointers, to help get you on track for starting on the first rung of the ‘fitness ladder’. Remember, you know your body better than anyone else, so make sure you treat it with respect, listen to it and learn from it, and it will take care of you and reward you with the success of achieving your goals.